3-8

3-8. Alcohol-related risk

3-8-1. Alcohol-related single occasion injury risk in South Australia – by Statistical Area

3-8-2. Alcohol-related single occasion injury risk in South Australia – by age and sex

3-8-3. Alcohol-related single occasion injury risk – by socio-economic status

3-8-4. Alcohol-related lifetime risk in South Australia – by Statistical Area

3-8-5. Alcohol-related lifetime risk in South Australia – by age and sex

3-8-6. Alcohol-related lifetime risk – by socio-economic status

3-8-7. Long-term risk of harm from alcohol – by state and territory

3-8-8. Long-term risk of harm from alcohol – Aboriginal people

Sources

 

3-8-1. Alcohol-related single occasion injury risk in South Australia – by Statistical Area

  • Under current guidelines on alcohol consumption produced by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC), for healthy men and women, drinking no more than four standard drinks on a single occasion at least monthly reduces the risk of alcohol-related injury arising from that occasion.
  • In 2016, over a quarter (26.1%) of South Australians aged 15 years or more reported drinking more than four standard alcoholic drinks on a single occasion at least monthly, putting them at risk of alcohol-related injury.
  • The rate varies substantially between Australian Bureau of Statistics' defined Statistical Areas (SA4s), from 22.1% in the Country SA South-East SA4 to 48.3% in the Country SA Outback SA4.
  • A statistically significant trend was identified over the last five years of available data in the Country SA series.
  • Please note that data prior to 2011 is not available.

 

At risk of alcohol-related injury (aged 15+ years), 2016
Statistical Area (SA4)%
Metro. Adelaide - North SA423.6%
Metro. Adelaide - Central & Hills SA423.2%
Metro. Adelaide - West SA424.2%
Metro. Adelaide - South SA430.0%
Metropolitan Adelaide25.8%
Country SA - Barossa Yorke Mid North SA422.6%
Country SA - Outback SA448.3%
Country SA - South East SA422.1%
Country SA26.8%
South Australia26.1%
Australian.a.

3-8-1

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3-8-2. Alcohol-related single occasion injury risk in South Australia – by age and sex

  • Under current guidelines on alcohol consumption produced by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC), for healthy men and women, drinking no more than four standard drinks on a single occasion at least monthly reduces the risk of alcohol-related injury arising from that occasion.
  • In 2016, the proportion of males aged 15 years or more who reported drinking on a single occasion at least monthly at levels that puts them at risk of alcohol-related injury (35.4%) was around double the female rate (17.1%).
  • Level of risk is also correlated with age, with the highest proportions among both males and females occurring in the younger age cohorts.

 


At risk of alcohol-related injury (aged 15+ years), 2016
Age (years)MalesFemales
15-2441.5%35.8%
25-3441.7%19.1%
35-4444.4%17.4%
45-5439.4%19.9%
55-6431.9%11.7%
65-7423.4%7.3%
75+9.1%1.2%
All ages35.4%17.1%

3-8-2

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3-8-3. Alcohol-related single occasion injury risk in South Australia – by socio-economic status

  • Under current guidelines on alcohol consumption produced by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC), for healthy men and women, drinking no more than four standard drinks on a single occasion at least monthly reduces the risk of alcohol-related injury arising from that occasion.
  • There is no clear correlation between proportion of people aged 15 years or more who report drinking on a single occasion at least monthly that puts them at risk of alcohol-related injury and the socio-economic status (SES) of the area in which they live.

 

At risk of alcohol-related injury (aged 15+ years), 2016
Socio-economic status (SES)%
Lowest SES27.4%
Low SES23.0%
Middle SES25.7%
High SES21.7%
Highest SES31.6%

3-8-3

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3-8-4. Alcohol-related lifetime risk in South Australia – by Statistical Area

  • Under current guidelines on alcohol consumption produced by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC), for healthy men and women, drinking no more than two standard drinks on any day reduces the lifetime risk of harm from alcohol-related disease or injury.
  • In 2016, roughly one in six (16.5%) South Australians aged 15 years or more reported drinking more than two standard alcoholic drinks on any day, putting them at lifetime risk of harm from alcohol-related disease or injury.
  • The rate varies substantially between Australian Bureau of Statistics' defined Statistical Areas (SA4s), from 10.8% in the Country SA Barossa-Yorke-Mid North SA4 to 38.2% in the Country SA Outback SA4.
  • A statistically significant underlying trend was identified over the last five years of available data in the metropolitan Adelaide series.
  • Please note that data prior to 2011 is not available.

 

At lifetime risk of alcohol-related disease or injury (aged 15+ years), 2016
Statistical Area (SA4)%
Metro. Adelaide - North SA414.0%
Metro. Adelaide - Central & Hills SA416.9%
Metro. Adelaide - West SA413.8%
Metro. Adelaide - South SA419.8%
Metropolitan Adelaide16.3%
Country SA - Barossa Yorke Mid North SA410.8%
Country SA - Outback SA438.2%
Country SA - South East SA412.2%
Country SA17.2%
South Australia16.5%
Australian.a.

3-8-4

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3-8-5. Alcohol-related lifetime risk in South Australia – by age and sex

  • Under current guidelines on alcohol consumption produced by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC), for healthy men and women, drinking no more than two standard drinks on any day reduces the lifetime risk of harm from alcohol-related disease or injury.
  • In 2016, around a quarter (24.2%) of males aged 15 years or more reported drinking on a day at levels that puts them at lifetime risk of alcohol-related disease or injury, more than double the corresponding female rate (9.1%).
  • The disproportionate levels of lifetime risk of harm from alcohol for males compared to females is recorded across all age cohorts.

 


At lifetime risk of alcohol-related disease or injury (aged 15+ years), 2016
Age (years)MalesFemales
15-249.1%6.5%
25-3419.4%6.7%
35-4432.2%7.3%
45-5434.7%16.7%
55-6427.0%12.6%
65-7431.6%7.3%
75+13.2%4.1%
All ages24.2%9.1%

3-8-5

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3-8-6. Alcohol-related lifetime risk in South Australia – by socio-economic status

  • Under current guidelines on alcohol consumption produced by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC), for healthy men and women, drinking no more than two standard drinks on any day reduces the lifetime risk of harm from alcohol-related disease or injury.
  • There is no clear correlation between proportion of people aged 15 years or more who report drinking at levels that put them at a lifetime risk of harm from alcohol and the socio-economic status (SES) of the area in which they live.

 

At lifetime risk of alcohol-related disease or injury (aged 15+ years), 2016
Socio-economic status (SES)%
Lowest SES14.9%
Low SES16.1%
Middle SES15.8%
High SES14.1%
Highest SES21.0%

3-8-6

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3-8-7. Long-term risk of harm from alcohol – by state and territory

  • Data presented here is from the Australian Bureau of Statistics’ 2014-15 National Health Survey for people aged 18 years and over. Therefore it is not directly comparable to the 2016 information presented in 3-8-4 to 3-8-6 above from the South Australian Health Omnibus Survey which is for persons aged 15 years and over. However, the survey uses the same guidelines on alcohol consumption produced by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC). i.e., that for healthy men and women, drinking no more than two standard drinks on any day reduces the lifetime risk of harm from alcohol-related disease or injury.
  • The national survey found that about one in six (16.8%) of South Australians aged 18 years and over had average daily consumption of alcohol that puts them at lifetime risk of alcohol-related disease or injury . This is a reduction from the 18.1% reported in the previous survey (for 2011-12).
  • The rate for South Australians was at the lower end nationally, only Victoria and the Australian Capital Territory having lower reported rates.

 


Average daily alcohol consumption exceeding lifetime risk guidelines (aged 18+ years), 2014-15
State/Territory%
Victoria15.6%
Australian Capital Territory15.7%
South Australia16.8%
New South Wales17.6%
Queensland18.0%
Tasmania18.6%
Northern Territory19.3%
Western Australia20.8%
Australia17.4%

3-8-7

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3-8-8. Long-term risk of harm from alcohol – Aboriginal people

  • Under current guidelines on alcohol consumption produced by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC), for healthy men and women, drinking no more than two standard drinks on any day reduces the lifetime risk of harm from alcohol-related disease or injury.
  • Less than one in ten (9.6%) Aboriginal people in South Australia aged 15 years or more reported exceeding lifetime risk guidelines (2009 NHMRC guidelines) for alcohol consumption, well below the national average for Aboriginal people of 14.7%.
  • Compared to Aboriginal people aged 15 years and over in other states and territories, South Australia was ranked the lowest for this indicator.
  • The 2014-15 rate for Aboriginal people (ages 15 years and over) of 9.6% was also below the 2014-15 all-population rate reported above in 3-8-7 for South Australia (ages 18 years and over) of 16.8%.

 


At lifetime risk of alcohol-related disease or injury - Aboriginal people (aged 15+ years), 2014-15
State/Territory%
South Australia9.6%
Victoria10.8%
Australian Capital Territory12.0%
Northern Territory13.3%
Tasmania14.5%
Queensland15.2%
New South Wales16.2%
Western Australia16.8%
Australia14.7%

3-8-8

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Sources

  1. Based on Health Omnibus Survey customised extract 2017, Drug and Alcohol Services South Australia, SA Health, Adelaide.
  2. Based on ABS 2015, ‘Table 10.1 Alcohol consumption — Longer term/Lifetime risk, Persons (estimate)’ and in Tables 20-27 for each jurisdiction, National Health Survey: First Results, 2014-15, cat. no. 4364.0.55.001, viewed 1 June 2016.
  3. Based on ABS 2016, 'Table 2.3 Selected characteristics, by state or territory of usual residence, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander persons aged 15 years and over – 2014-15, Proportion of persons', National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Survey, Australia, 2014-15, cat. no. 4714.0, viewed 6 September 2016.